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Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery

Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery

The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) is a multiple-aptitude battery that measures developed abilities and helps predict future academic and occupational success in the military. It is administered annually to more than one million military applicants, high school, and post-secondary students.

 

WHAT TO EXPECT

The U.S. armed forces have high standards for enlistment. An important part of a recruiter’s job is to screen applicants to ensure they measure up. Even before a recruiter will send you to take the ASVAB, he/she will ask about your marital status, health, education, drug use, and arrest record. It’s very important that you answer these questions openly and honestly. Once the recruiter has determined that you are qualified for further processing, you will be scheduled to take the ASVAB. A physical exam may also be conducted at that time.

 

PREPARING FOR THE ASVAB

The ASVAB Testing Program does not endorse any particular method of test preparation beyond recommending that examinees take a solid core of courses in mathematics, English, and science in high school and/or college. Such academic preparation will help with performance on the Arithmetic Reasoning, Mathematics Knowledge, Paragraph Comprehension, Word Knowledge, and General Science subtests. Taking technical courses will also help with performance on the Auto Information, Shop Information, Electronics Information, and Mechanical Comprehension subtests.

 

WHERE TO TAKE THE TEST

If you are interested in taking the ASVAB in order to apply for military enlistment, you will need to contact a military recruiter. To find a recruiter near you, go to http://www.todaysmilitary.com/ and click on “Request More Info.” When the recruiter has determined that you are otherwise qualified, he/she will set up a time for you to take the ASVAB at the closest Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS) or an affiliated Military Entrance Test (MET) site.

 

For more information about the ASVAB, visit the official website.

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