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  • Suicide Prevention: Suicide Myth No. 3

    Suicide Myth No. 3: People who attempt suicide and survive are just seeking attention; they seldom ever try it again. Truth: At some level, all suicide attempts are cries for help by individuals experiencing a high degree of desperation. It is important to treat all attempts as serious. Once an attempt is made at any level of lethality, the risk for future and more serious attempts and completion increases significantly.
  • Air Force hosts EFMP summit for exceptional family members

    Being the parent of a child with asthma, cancer, autism or any other life-threatening or chronic condition is often a difficult journey that requires patience and sacrifice.Fortunately, thousands of active-duty members have found support through the Air Force Exceptional Family Member Program, which allows Airmen to proceed
  • AF selects winner of Gen. Mark A. Welsh One Air Force Award

    Air Force officials recently named the U.S. Air Force Airfield Pavement Evaluation Team, Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas, as the winner of the 2018 Gen. Mark A. Welsh III One Air Force Award.
  • September enlisted in-system supplemental promotion list released

    The Air Force selected 1,026 Airmen today for promotion via the enlisted in-system supplemental promotion process.
  • Sucide Prevention: Suicide Myth No. 2

    Suicide Myth No. 2: Most suicides happen suddenly without warning. Truth: 80 percent of suicides have been preceded by warning signs, whether verbal or behavioral. These signals often include making a joke or threat about suicide, making a reference to being dead, or giving away treasured possessions. Of course there are some suicides that occur without warning. But it is important to understand what the warning signs are and look out for them.
  • Sucide Prevention: Suicide Myth No. 2

    Suicide Myth No. 2: Most suicides happen suddenly without warning. Truth: 80 percent of suicides have been preceded by warning signs, whether verbal or behavioral. These signals often include making a joke or threat about suicide, making a reference to being dead, or giving away treasured possessions. Of course there are some suicides that occur without warning. But it is important to understand what the warning signs are and look out for them.
  • AF officials select three captains for Ph.D. program

    Air Force officials have selected three primary and three alternate captains for the Chief of Staff of the Air Force Captains Prestigious Ph.D. Program.The program offers captains the opportunity to earn their doctoral degrees in strategic studies at top universities with the goal of building Air Force and joint leaders who
  • AF names 2018 AFA Outstanding Civilians

    The Air Force recently announced the winners of the 2018 Air Force Association Outstanding Air Force Civilian Employee of the Year awards. Nominations for the next year are due to the Air Force’s Personnel Center no later than Jan. 4, 2019.
  • Suicide Myth #1

    Myth no. 1: Once someone is suicidal, he or she will always remain suicidal. Most suicidal people are desperately seeking a way out of unbearable emotional pain and are ambivalent about ending their own lives. Heightened suicide risk is often short-term and situation-specific. While suicidal thoughts may return, they are not permanent and an individual with previously suicidal thoughts and attempts can go on to live a long life.
  • Seven units approved for AF Organizational Excellence Award

    The Secretary of the Air Force Personnel Council recently approved seven organizations for the Air Force Organizational Excellence Award for 2016.
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